Low turnout at Washington ex-gay pride event

Originally published in Urban Christian News

On Wednesday, July 31, a small band of former homosexuals representing about 10 organizations stood on the steps of the Supreme Court to demand recognition and equal rights under the Constitution.

“Anti-ex-gay extremists say that I do not exist–that we don’t exist,” said Christopher Doyle, president of Voice of the Voiceless and Equality and Justice for All. “Tell that to my wife of seven years. Tell that to my three beautiful children.”

Some of the activists spent the morning in meetings on Capitol Hill. Doyle told me he met with Democrats and Republicans, all cordial, but “Republicans were definitely more sympathetic.”

Wednesday’s event marked the first Ex-Gay Pride Month, which the group designated the month of July. Organizers had originally planned a reception for Wednesday night at the Family Research Council, but emailed and phoned threats from homosexual activists caused them to postpone the event until September at an undisclosed location. Mat Staver, founder of Liberty Counsel, will receive the first Ex-Gay Pride Freedom Award at the event.

Greg Quinlan, president of Parents and Friends of Ex-Gays and Gays (PFOX), said homosexual activists have no room for other opinions because they want to “take over” education, healthcare, and government, so theirs is the only voice heard. Quinlan, a lobbyist, said he learned his trade while working with the Human Rights Campaign Fund in the 1980s and ’90s.

“When you see that equality sign in their logo, it’s not about equality–it’s about dominance,” Quinlan told me. “It’s not about human rights. It’s about sexual rights of a small sexual minority.”

The assembled speakers on Wednesday only numbered about a dozen, but they said there are thousands of ex-gays around the country who are afraid to identify as such.

“I have suffered more discrimination and intolerance as an ex-gay than I did when I was actually in the [homosexual] lifestyle,” said Grace Harley, an African-American woman who lived for 18 years as a transgendered man named Joe. “Former homosexuals like me need protection.”

2 Comments

  1. The “gay rights” movement started out demanding tolerance but has moved to demanding that everyone endorse their sexual perversion. Quinlan’s comment, “When you see that equality sign in their logo, it’s not about equality–it’s about dominance,” is telling, as is the fact that ex-gays are so hounded and intimidated by gays that they cannot “come out” as ex-gays publicly without being vilified and receiving threats.
    Those who demand tolerance are the most intolerant…