Sports Roundup — Monday, August 4, 2014

Cricket:

Kallis lauded as an all-time great

Tributes continued to pour in for Jacques Kallis, who retired from international cricket after an illustrious 19-year career. Fellow cricketers and the South African Cricketers’ Association (Saca) praised Kallis for his outstanding contribution to the game on Thursday.

 Proteas test captain Hashim Amla, said it was an honour to have played alongside Kallis.

“Jacques was a one in 50 years cricketer who had a huge influence on so many Proteas players over a 20-year period.  “I was privileged to have been one of those. You appreciate the magnitude of the cricketer not only when you look at his record but also when you play alongside him,” Amla said. Saca president Robin Peterson said Kallis’s composure and poised demeanour would be sorely missed. “People were entertained by Jacques on the field and statistically he is the greatest South African cricketer ever.

 “What we were able to see as players, however, was the man behind all the records. The aura in the change room, the calming influence on other players and the wonderfully subtle sense of humour, often in tight situations,” Peterson said.

 Highveld Lions captain Stephen Cook said the legendary all-rounder was an inspiration for many players. “Most of us playing franchise cricket in South Africa aspire to playing for the Proteas and most have a player we want to be like. For so many striving young franchise cricketers that player was Jacques Kallis. He has inspired so many cricketers at many levels.”

 Test Stats

Batsmen

Span

Mat

Inns

NO

Runs

HS

Ave

100

50

0

1. JH Kallis *

1995-2013

165

278

39

13206

224

55.25

45

58

16

 

Bowlers

Span

Mat

Balls

Runs

Wkts

BBI

BBM

Ave

Econ

SR

5

10

5. JH Kallis *

1995-2013

165

20172

9497

291

6/54

9/92

32.63

2.82

69.3

5

0

 

ODI Stats

Batsmen

Span

Mat

Inns

NO

Runs

HS

Ave

BF

SR

100

50

0

4s

6s

1. JH Kallis*

1996-2013

320

306

53

11545

139

45.63

15774

73.19

17

86

16

910

137

 

Bowlers

Span

Mat

Overs

Mdns

Runs

Wkts

BBI

Ave

Econ

SR

4

5

3. JH Kallis*

1996-2013

320

1773.0

77

8568

269

5/30

31.85

4.83

39.5

2

2

 

Rugby:

Super rugby:

Final:

Third time lucky for Waratahs

It was third time lucky for the Waratahs as Bernard Foley slotted 79th minute penalty to give them a nail-biting 33-32 win over the Crusaders to win the Vodacom Super Rugby final. Foley’s 45 metre strike – which ironically came from a penalty against All Black captain Richie McCaw – sailed just over the bar to be the difference between the two sides in an epic final where the result was in doubt all the way. It ended the title drought for the Waratahs, who have lost their only two final appearances to the Crusaders, and gave coach Michael Cheika a rare double of winning both Super Rugby and the Heineken Cup as coach.

Foley scored a massive 23 points with the boot as the Waratahs scored a record 10th home win for the season, showing their consistency and true worth as Super Rugby champions. But it was a nail-biting affair as the Waratahs swept to a 14 point lead in the opening 15 minutes, led 20-13 at halftime only to watch the Seven time Super Rugby champions haul them in and take the lead twice – the final time with just four minutes to play.

With South African referee Craig Joubert showing just why he is the best in the world with a superb refereeing performance, the final penalty came at a crucial point as the Waratahs were putting on phases and McCaw will have little argument when he sees the replay.

The loss also meant that Todd Blackadder’s run as Crusaders coach is now two losses in finals, after also losing the 2011 final to the Reds in Brisbane. While it was thought the Tahs pack may struggle up front against the clinical Crusaders, the home side started off exceptionally well to take an early lead thanks to Foley’s accurate boot. The fly half opened the scoring with a penalty, before a beauty of a long pass out from Kurtley Beale to Foley opened up a gap which eventually led to Adam Ashley-Cooper running with speed onto a ball to score the opening try.

Foley added two more penalties as the Waratahs built an innings to lead 14-0 before the Crusaders finally got themselves on the scoreboard through an excellent try to Matt Todd. Having recovered a loose ball that was kicked downfield by the Tahs, the Crusaders started a counter-attack from deep in their own half, as Ryan Crotty put Kieran Reid into the gap and the IRB Player of the year put the perfect pass out to Todd in space, with the flanker sprinting in for the try.

Foley added two more penalties with Colin Slade adding two before the break as the sides went in 20-13 at halftime. There was a bit of controversy early on in the second half as the Crusaders drew level through man-mountain Nemani Nadolo, who beat two tackles to go over and score. Replays however showed that his foot may have touched the side line before he dotted down, but this was ignored by the television match referee who told Joubert to award the try.

The Tahs scrum started to squeak, and two monster scrums later Slade took the lead for the Crusaders as he grabbed the three points on offer after a collapsed scrum. Foley was quick to reply and it was clear the game was set to go down to the wire as neither team looked set to succumb and give in. Slade again grabbed the lead after Sekopi Kepu high-tackled Tom Taylor but the Tahs were not going to hold back and launched a massive attack that went through 12 phases before that man Ashley-Cooper again broke a tackle to go over and score his second of the match.

Given this was his first Super Rugby final in his 10 years in the game, the decorated Wallaby certainly deserved his man of the match award for his performance. The four point lead was cut to one by Slade as the Crusaders pressed hard and as the clock ticked down towards the end, the Waratahs were pinned for off-side, allowing Slade to slot an easy penalty with four minutes to go to make it 32-30 to the New Zealanders.

The Waratahs started a final push and were rewarded with the penalty, with much debate whether Foley could make the distance. His kick sailed straight and low, and crept over the crossbar by a slim margin, but it was enough to be worthy of the title. The Tahs ended off the league phase as the No 1 side on the log, and were equally worthy winners of the final. If they can translate this momentum into Wallaby success in the Castle Lager Rugby Championship waits to be seen.

SCORERS:

 Waratahs – Tries: Adam Ashley-Cooper (2); Conversions: Bernard Foley; Penalties: Foley (7)

Crusaders – Tries: Matt Todd, Nemani Nadolo; Conversions: Dan Carter, Colin Slade; Penalties: Slade (6)

Soccer:

MTN8 | Results

Kaizer Chiefs eased into the semifinals of the MTN8 with a comfortable 4-0 win over Black Aces at FNB Stadium on Sunday afternoon. The Amakhosi’s victory was set up by two early goals from Reneilwe Letsholonyane and Kingston Nkhatha, before Mandla Masango added a brace in the second half to ensure a comfortable final third of the match for Stuart Baxter’s side.

After a number of misfires in front of goal, Orlando Pirates coach Vladimir Vermezovic said his club was fortunate to have escaped with a 2-1 victory against SuperSport United in their MTN8 encounter on Saturday evening. “It is usually the case in football that if you miss many opportunities, you deserve to lose the match,” said Vermezovic after the match.

Platinum Stars got their defense of the MTN8 title off to a perfect start on Saturday afternoon, comfortably beating Mamelodi Sundowns 2-1 at Loftus Versfeld in Pretoria. Skipper Vuyo Mere netted from the penalty spot just seven minutes in, before Ndumiso Mabena added a second shortly after to leave Sundowns with a mountain to climb by halftime.

Wits coach Gavin Hunt conceded his side’s 4-3 MTN8 cup win on penalties over Bloemfontein Celtic on Friday was not the most entertaining football match. “It was a fight and a battle out there, that’s all the game was,” Hunt said at Bidvest stadium after his side advanced to the semifinals of the competition. “The hard pitch didn’t help matters as well. We couldn’t get the ball down and play our game. It wasn’t lovely to watch,” he said.

Golf:

Russian Open | LEADERBOARD 

1

David Horsey

-13

F

E

65

68

70

72

275

2

Damien Mcgrane

-13

F

-6

69

71

69

66

275

3

Scott Jamieson

-12

F

-3

66

72

69

69

276

4

Sam Hutsby

-11

F

-4

72

67

70

68

277

5

Peter Whiteford

-10

F

+3

66

71

66

75

278

6

Krister Eriksson

-9

F

-4

72

68

71

68

279

6

Thomas Pieters

-9

F

E

67

68

72

72

279

8

Andrea Pavan

-8

F

+1

73

70

64

73

280

8

Maximilian Kieffer

-8

F

-3

67

71

73

69

280

10

Sam Walker

-7

F

-4

69

71

73

68

281

10

Carlos Del Moral

-7

F

-5

70

71

73

67

281

12

Fredrik Andersson Hed

-6

F

-6

70

69

77

66

282

12

Mikko Korhonen

-6

F

-3

74

71

68

69

282

12

Daan Huizing

-6

F

-5

72

74

69

67

282

12

Adrien Saddier

-6

F

-2

69

73

70

70

282

12

Haydn Porteous

-6

F

-3

72

71

70

69

282

12

Brinson Paolini

-6

F

-3

72

71

70

69

282

Woods pulls out of WGC due to injury

Defending champion Tiger Woods pulled out of the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational in Akron, Ohio on Sunday after aggravating his troublesome back, raising more questions about the playing future of the 14-times major champion.

His participation in Thursday’s PGA Championship in Kentucky, the final major of the year, must be highly doubtful although Woods said it was too early to speculate. He also must be considered increasingly unlikely to be on the American team for next month’s Ryder Cup in Scotland.

He looked to be in pain after his drive at the ninth hole of the final round before deciding to retire on four over par, 18 shots behind overnight leader Sergio Garcia at Firestone Country Club. Woods, who had made a double-bogey on the seventh hole, was limping as he climbed into a golf cart and left the course. He later issued a short statement.

“It happened on the second hole when I hit my second shot. I fell back in the bunker. I just jarred it and it’s been spamming ever since,” he said. “It’s just the whole lower back. I don’t know what happened when I landed.”

The latest injury setback comes barely four months after Woods had lower back surgery to relieve an impinged nerve. He had the procedure after intense pain caused him to pull out of the Honda Classic on March 2, also during the final round. The 38-year-old missed the first two majors of the year, the Masters and US Open, and the Bridgestone Invitational was just his third event since he returned to action.

He has long been driven by a burning desire to surpass the record of 18 major titles held by Jack Nicklaus. But he has not won a major since the 2008 US Open, and has reached an age after which nobody in the modern era has regularly won major championships, even fully healthy.

Even before his latest setback he struggled to drive the ball as well as the current crop of top players such as Rory McIlroy, Adam Scott and Garcia. Woods showed no immediate sign of distress after hitting his second shot from an awkward lie in lush rough above a bunker at the par-five second hole on Sunday.

He lost his balance after playing the shot but stayed on his feet as he trotted eight paces through the sand back to the fairway. But he was in obvious pain by the fifth hole, where he winced in pain after his tee shot.

England are tops as Commonwealth Games end

England triumphed in the Commonwealth Games medals table for the first time in 28 years on Sunday, but there were final day consolations for former top dog Australia with wins in men’s hockey, netball and a squash double.

England started the day already assured of top spot in the medals table for the first time since 1986, dethroning Australia. By the end of Sunday’s action, with just 11 more titles to be decided, England had captured 174 medals of which 58 were gold.

Australia, who will host the next Games in 2018, finished on a total of 137 with 49 gold.

On a rain-hit final day in Glasgow, Lizzie Armistead struck further gold for England in the women’s cycling road race going one better than four years ago in New Delhi. Fellow English rider Emma Pooley finished 25 seconds behind to finish second and add to the silver she won in the time trial.

“I can call myself a champion finally. It’s special and something I’ve always dreamed about,” Armistead said. “I just feel like I deserve this. I’ve trained so hard and I’m always on the podium but I don’t win too many races.” Welsh rider Geraint Thomas then won gold in the grueling men’s 168km road race.

Thomas, who won bronze in the time trial, survived suffering a puncture with just 6km to go to finish in a time of four hours 13 minutes and five seconds. A sprint finish saw New Zealand’s Jack Bauer claim silver while Scott Thwaites took bronze for England. “I’m a massive diesel engine at the moment,” said Thomas, whose day got even better when it was revealed he would carry the Welsh flag in the closing ceremony later Sunday.

Australia won gold in the men’s hockey with a 4-0 thumping of India for a fifth consecutive Commonwealth title, and in the netball with a 58-40 revenge win over New Zealand, who beat them at the same stage four years ago. Scottish hopes of a 20th gold medal were dashed when Kirsty Gilmour lost 21-14, 21-7 to Canada’s Michelle Li in the badminton women’s singles final.

India’s Kashyap Parupalli was a popular winner in the men’s singles title as he beat Derek Wong of Singapore in a three-game classic to win gold. “I’m so happy,” said the 27-year-old Indian. “This championship means such a lot to me. These Games come every four years and that’s what drove me on.” English husband and wife pairing Chris and Gabrielle Adcock comfortably won the mixed doubles; Khe Wei Won equaled the Malaysian badminton gold medal record as she went level on four with Eei Hun Chun after she won the women’s doubles with partner Vivian Kah Mun Hoo.

Malaysia also won the men’s doubles through Tan Wee Kiong and Goh Wei Shem.

Australia won the two remaining titles in the squash tournament. David Palmer, 38, had come out of retirement in a bid to finally add a winning squash medal to his Commonwealth Games collection and he ended with two on Sunday. First Palmer teamed with Rachael Grinham to beat England’s Alison Waters and Peter Barker 11-8, 11-10 in the mixed final. He then joined Cameron Pilley to deny singles champion Nick Matthew and his teammate Adrian Grant in the men’s doubles, winning 11-7, and 11-9.

“I almost ran out of gas,” admitted Palmer after the Games’ concluding gold medal event.

Meanwhile, Games officials turned out to sing the praises of the Glasgow showpiece with Mike Hooper, CEO of the Commonwealth Games Federation calling them “the stand-out Games in the history of the movement.”

“The spirit of these Games has continued to endure,” he added.

Moolman Pasio wins SA’s 40th medal

After 98km of cycling, it came down to two millimeters but Ashleigh Moolman Pasio got her tyre in front when it counted to grab the bronze medal in an enthralling women’s road race on the final day of Commonwealth Games action in Glasgow.

The medal, South Africa’s first in cycling at a major championships since David George’s silver in Melbourne 2006, was the country’s 40th of these Games campaign. It sees them leave Glasgow in seventh place on the overall medals table, with 13 golds, 10 silvers and 17 bronzes.

Four years ago, in Delhi, Team South Africa returned with 33 medals, 12 of them gold, which placed them fifth. Here in Glasgow they fell one gold short of India and New Zealand, with Scotland, in fourth with 19 golds, rising to the occasion as hosts. 

Moolman Pasio rose a gutsy race, which was decided a long way from home over a seven-lap circuit around Glasgow when she joined a seven-strong breakaway group, which housed two Englishwoman, two Australians, a South African, New Zealander and Scot. Moolman Pasio had gone into the race in a confident frame of mind, and raced up to her lofty expectations. “I finished midfield in the individual time-trial and anything better than that would have been a bonus. My legs were feeling good and I was ready for the road race, really looking forward to it,” she said.

Despite the poor weather, which has seen a blanket of rain cover Glasgow the entire weekend – although it only really started to affect the cyclists in the last 15km on Sunday – the 28-year-old kept her concentration and road a smart race. She sat in the leading bunch and watched intently as the pair of Englishwomen and Australians tried to work as teams to break down the group.

Moolman Pasio however, looked strong and stayed in the group, which only fragmented inside the last 12km when Emma Pooley, the 31-year-old English rider competing in her last event at this level, broke away. She was quickly chased down and caught by the pre-race favorite, Lizzie Armistead, also of England, and from 10km out gold and silver had been decided. Credit must go to the cyclists for maintaining their concentration and grip around the tight corners of the city, while the rain came down, and inside the last couple of kilometers Moolman Pasio, Tiffany Cromwell and time-trial gold medalist Linda Villumsen broke away. The hunt for bronze was on and it would be decided in a sprint.

Moolman Pasio and Cromwell then dropped the Kiwi in the final straight as the South African led the charge. However, in the last few desperate meters Cromwell lunged and looked, for a split second to have her tyre in front, but the South African rallied in the last meter, with the photo finish showing that she had prevailed by a hundredth of a second, both being given identical times of 2 hours 39min 54sec.

They finished 1:11 behind Armistead, and 46 seconds behind silver medalist Pooley.

Moolman Pasio had ended 16th in the women’s road race at the London 2012 Olympics, but is a real force to be reckoned with internationally now and the winner of the 2012 Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour will make her presence felt at Rio 2016.

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