What made Bethel worship leader Sean Feucht take a leap to the streets?

Sean Feucht at a Let Us Worship event in Seattle. This year Sean has taken the Let Us Worship street worship movement to cities across the US at a time when indoor worship was restricted by Covid regulations (PHOTO: Julia Duin / RNS/Christianity Today)

Originally published in CBN

Why does a traditional worship leader, producer of 22 best-selling albums and co-author of five books, including his latest, Brazen: Be a Voice not an Echo (with sole authorship), leave the safe confines of his megachurch to take his worship ministry to the streets? To answer that question, you have to understand the man, Sean Feucht. Following his twitter feed helps too. 

Sean is the son of two passionate medical missionaries. He followed in their footsteps, first, becoming passionate about God, and later, about evangelism through worship missions. The family lived in Virgfinia Beach for several years while Sean’s father was employed as a medicical missionary for Operation Blessing. In his early twenties, Sean took to the mission field himself, traveling from the sands of war-torn Iraq to the dangerous streets of North Korea. Through it all, he sought God through personal worship, and then began leading others to Christ through the power of worship and praise. Sean says, “Worship invites God’s presence and creates an atmosphere where people are healed and delivered and saved.”

Watch the new ‘Let Us Worship’ documentary

After receiving a prophetic word to document the goings-on of the movement, filmmaker Sondra Martin Hicks followed Feucht’s worship events, travelling with him to the last few stops before the culmination at the National Mall on October 25.

You can watch a clip of the documentary here

Or watch the full version below:

Political failure leads to radical street worship 
In 2019, Sean was encouraged by some prominent Christian leaders to run for a 2020 Congressional office, with comments like, “We need a long-haired, Jesus loving worship leader to be a voice for a generation.” Sean never aspired to be a politician, yet he was gravely concerned about the state of our nation. After three days of fasting and prayer, he decided to pursue a congressional office with the same passion that defined everything else he did. After an arduous campaign, Sean was defeated at the polls.

“That election night failure broke me in many ways.” Sean says. He spent the next few weeks quarantined in his home, even before a raging pandemic would quarantine everyone. 

Restrictions, rampant hopelessness lead to radical worship movement
As Sean saw the the US in panic and pandemonion and people paralysed by fear, he felt another call to serve. He longed to raise a new sound of worship on the streets of America that would bring hope and healing. The severe Covid-19 restrictions for CA churches, concerned him as well. 

So with 400 worshippers on the Golden Gate bridge, Sean launched what has became a global worship and prayer movement. To date, he has led 46 rallies coast to coast to bring radical worship, healing, deliverance and salvation to the streets of our cities.

Sean says, “I have witnessed thousands of people running, leaping and surging toward the stage to commit or re-commit their lives to Jesus Christ. From battlegrounds like Portland and Seattle, and, most recently, our nation’s capital, the sounds of worship resounded. In DC, 35 000 people worshiping God drowned out the “gloom and doom” from the swamp. 

But worship rallies in the public arena haven’t come without controversy. During his ralies, Sean highly encourages the use of masks and social distancing, but does not harshly enforce it. This has led to stinging criticism and characterizations of Sean as a “Superspreader” and a “Plague Rat.” Another aspect of the conflict is not from the earthly realm. In the D.C. rally one of Sean’s team members was covered with a bowl of blood by an enraged Satanist. Sean’s response on social media says it it all, “You know you are breaking through in D.C. when a Satanist dumps a bowl of blood over your team member’s face.” Plus, Sean views the controversy in a broader context, “I’ve never seen this level of persecution and intimidation of the church. We have to rise up, be courageous, and take a stand.” 

Special Note: Looking forward to the new year, Sean is planning a rally celebrating New Year’s Eve on Azuza Street in Los Angeles, the site of the early 20th Century revival.

One Comment

  1. Sean is right when he “highly encourages the use of masks and social distancing,” Sean is wrong when he doesn’t lead by example – not practicing what he preaches. In the picture he and the others are NOT wearing masks. Sad.

    I hope he adds to his ‘worship-singing’ the Biblical necessity of “preaching the Word of God” (Acts 2) and “making disciples” (Matthew 28:18-20), so that there will be ‘fruit that will last” (John 15;16) when the world expresses its hatred of Jesus and His disciples (John 15:18ff).